Visionary Videos: Patricia Arquette @ Dreamforce

A leading voice in the equal pay fight, Patricia Arquette has graced many stages to talk about her work in closing the gap on wage equality for women. Watch this video in conversation at the Women's Leadership Summit at Dreamforce.

Pay Equality-From Hollywood to Silicon Valley: Hollywood's top female stars are finally speaking out about pay inequality in the movie business. But is change really on its way? The top-earning female dramatic actors take home around 40% of the salaries of their male co-stars-about half the average in other professions. Academy Award winning actress, Patricia Arquette, graces the Dreamforce stage to discuss why she is passionate about fighting for equal rights for women.

Rave Reviews: Soon Yu's best-selling book "Iconic Advantage"

Innovation expert Soon Yu has released his first book Iconic Advantage to rave reviews and on the Amazon best-seller list. Adam Grant says "This book explains why some brands are built to last and others seem doomed to perish. It’s a framework that every marketer can put into play right away."

In Iconic Advantage, Soon takes a look at some of the world’s largest brands to uncover the secrets of creating iconic properties and maximizing the value they create. Further, he reveals to readers the universal principles of iconicity—creating noticing power, enhancing staying power and driving scaling power—to immediately unlock iconic value in their existing products and stack the odds in their favor in developing new properties.

Check out more on the book and get your copy here on Amazon!

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Visionary Videos: Luvvie Ajay @ TEDWomen 2017

With over one million views in less than one month, many people have been inspired by the message that New York Times best-selling author and infamous blogger Luvvie Ajayi presented in New Orleans this year. Titled "Getting comfortable being uncomfortable," Luvvie shares at the core a message of speaking your mind by speaking your truth.

Check out the video for this bright, uplifting talk:

Luvvie Ajayi isn't afraid to speak her mind or to be the one dissenting voice in a crowd, and neither should you. "Your silence serves no one," says the writer, activist and self-proclaimed professional troublemaker.

Outspoken Observations: A co-founder's personal experience with mental health

I think and talk a lot about mental health. I believe the discussion is important, and admitting my own battles with anxiety has eased the plight for a lot of my friends.  There is value in feeling like you’re not alone in your struggles.  And I’m grateful that organizations like Movember are putting a spotlight on the benefits of sharing your feelings, and putting programs in place to help people open up - because it isn’t always easy.  But it seems like a great place to start.

For most of my life, I have suffered with an anxiety disorder surrounding communication. For instance, if a friend didn’t respond to a text or email in what I considered to be an expedient manner, my go to thought would be “I did something to make them not like me” or “that person is angry with me.” And I deeply believed that to be true. My mind would start shuffling through possible scenarios where I had wronged said person. “Well maybe it was because I spilled wine on her couch” or “maybe she doesn’t want to be my friend because I got too drunk at that party.”  This would go on for hours. What had I done to make myself so unlikeable that someone could just throw me to the wayside? What mistake had I made to make myself so discardable? And then they would respond to my text. I’d be relieved.  And that’s how I lived and interacted with the world. I terrorized myself.  

I thought this was normal. I thought it was normal that I had set a standard on communication response time and that any one who didn’t adhere to such standard was in the wrong, and I would lash out. Then finally, people had a logical reason to not want to be around me. It wasn’t because I spilled wine on their couch or got too drunk at whatever party, it was because I made it impossible to please me. I was a walking and talking self-fulfilling prophecy. And the question that I finally had to ask myself was:  why?  

After some time spent in therapy, I finally found an answer: I hated myself. My self-worth was low. And the reason why I was doubting my relationships was because I truly believed that I wasn’t worthy of friendship and love.  

I’m lucky, in that, I’m educated and I have a support system. I have the wherewith-all to research my symptoms and strategize a plan to get better. And I have the resources to execute that plan. I also have the desire for self-improvement. Think about how rare that combination is. If any piece of that puzzle was missing, I would never get the chance to be happy.    

I’m no longer a walking, talking self-fulfilling prophecy. I’m walking, talking proof that speaking openly about your feelings is a solution to having a healthy mind.  

During these last two weeks of November, it’s important to keep conversations like this top of mind. We love working with organizations like Movember and their co-founder Adam Garone who recognize the importance of being vulnerable with one another, and help us all to feel a little less alone, in part with their month-long (and year round) campaign in support of men’s health.  Adam, as well as General Donald Bolduc, are both strong proponents in advocating for the discussion of mental health issues, including suicide prevention and post-traumatic stress (PTS). We continue to support them in getting their messages out to our event hosts for programming ideas at their next event. Building community and supporting a healthy mind makes any organization that much stronger. Always here to talk on or offline about this subject that is especially near and dear to me.

Bust it,